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Gig Review; Twin Kimble @ Alleycat, 29/8/15

Gig Review; Twin Kimble @ Alleycat, 29/8/15

By: Kasimiira Kontio, Photography by Thomas Rosser

Blinded by the darkness of the basement and overwhelmed by the smell of stale beer bottles, I enter atmospheric The Alleycat in Soho on Saturday night. Looking for familiar faces, I venture towards the bar, grab a beer and have a stroll cut short by a crowd of people arriving. There is a beautiful sense of continuity in the sea of people I am surrounded by. Regardless of being twenty, thirty years apart, I see the young “noughties mods” accompanied by the charmingly nostalgic older rockers reminiscing the past and waiting for the gig to start. I hear the Rolling Stones going on which is immediately greeted with a sing-a-long as we wait for Twin Kimble to take over.

Blinded by the darkness of the basement and overwhelmed by the smell of stale beer bottles, I enter the atmospheric The Alleycat in Soho, London on Saturday night. Looking for familiar faces, I venture towards the bar, grab a beer and have a stroll cut short by a crowd of people arriving. There is a beautiful sense of continuity in the sea of people I am surrounded by. Regardless of being twenty, thirty years apart, I see the young “noughties mods” accompanied by the charmingly nostalgic older rockers reminiscing the past and waiting for the gig to start. I hear the Rolling Stones going on (which is immediately greeted with a sing-a-long) as we wait for Twin Kimble to take over.

Accompanied by large projections of cinematic gems like the 1954 Godzilla and 1990 Frankenhooker, the Southampton and London based Twin Kimble steps on the stage. The venue is soon drowned by a sound of overpowering guitar riffs of their first instrumental track, which soon introduces us to the enigmatic and overpowering sound of the four-piece garage rock outfit.

Formed in 2013, the band has developed a sound that stands out with its attitude and sincerity regardless of the group’s clear dedication towards the likes of The White Stripes, Queens of The Stone Age and Red Hot Chilli Peppers. It is unashamed and honest garage rock that is ideally blasted through your shitty-yet-beloved car stereos on your way to a sonic nirvana.

Without saying any more than their “thank you's” between the songs, they skillfully manoeuvred their audience from shoegazey rock dimensions of 'Fever Lately' to lullaby-like prog world of 'Walk With Me'. Track after track, the beer and adrenaline enhanced screaming and laughter around the bar gets louder. “We’re Twin Kimble and this is our last song!” the lead singer Will Barratt screams in the microphone, as I see a monochromatic Godzilla emerging on the wall behind the drummer Jack Kennedy. High on the sonic rush and exhausted by the vigorous guitars, I embrace the atmosphere and do the awkward headbanging alongside the handful of elderly men as the band throws in the last punches of their set. 'Barebones' is soon turned into a sweat dripping jam off with Kennedy banging drums with grotesque rage and Barratt throwing away his guitar to amp up Simon Uphill’s guitar. As they finish, the Godzilla is gone but the monstrous power of their performance lingers around for a while.

There is unrefined anarchy in the sound of Twin Kimble that is charming with its lack of bullshit. It is fuel for youthful anger encouraging us to take a stand and being true to who we are. Flirting with genres from shoegaze to prog rock, Twin Kimble has cooked up a cocktail of sonic bliss that is found lying on your bed with headphones on staring at the ceiling and letting all of your flow out of you.

 

Find Twin Kimble on Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/twin-kimble

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