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End Of The Road Festival 2015 - Part two, Saturday

End Of The Road Festival 2015 - Part two, Saturday

By: Kasimiira Kontio, Photography by Thomas Rosser

What makes this boutique festival stand out with all its glory is its careful and delicate attention to detail and it can be seen throughout the site. In the morning of the day two of End of The Road Festival, I headed to The Woods area to breathe in the fresh forest air and stumble upon the curiosities hidden in the maze of trees. I wandered through the healing areas, bumped into masseuses wearing elf ears and had my avian alter ego drawn for me by the mysterious artists behind The Bird Watch project. Needless to say, the festival design turned out to be like a drug offering an aesthetic high of beautiful things put together by the brilliant creative team behind the festival lay out.

What makes this boutique festival stand out with all its glory is its careful and delicate attention to detail and it can be seen throughout the site. In the morning of the day two of End of The Road Festival, I headed to The Woods area to breathe in the fresh forest air and stumble upon the curiosities hidden in the maze of trees. I wandered through the healing areas, bumped into masseuses wearing elf ears and had my avian alter ego drawn for me by the mysterious artists behind The Bird Watch project. Needless to say, the festival design turned out to be like a drug offering an aesthetic high of beautiful things put together by the brilliant creative team behind the festival lay out.

After getting lost in the beauty of the forest area I ventured to check out Liverpool-based Stealing Sheep who pulled me back to reality with their eclectic mix of 1950s exotica, avant garde and Grayson Perry influenced artsy electro pop. The band’s performance fueled me with obscure girl power and left me feeling ecstatic over their intense and incredibly tight show of sonic experimentation.

As the September night drew closer (and colder), I found myself grinning like an idiot from excitement and waiting for the mystical Sufjan Stevens to arrive. During his first ever UK Festival performance, Stevens wowed his crowed with his ethereal performance silencing the audience with sincere sadness and making them rejoice life. Like many others around me, I found myself swallowing tears during classics like “Casimir Pulaski Dayand “Seven Swans”.

Focusing mostly on his latest album Carrie and Lowell, Stevens serenaded the audience in a charmingly stereotypically American get-up including his seemingly favourite piece of clothing – his trucker cap. This time, he had left his traditional fairy wings at home but it did not make the show any less magical. According to him, God had appeared to him in a dream and told him to play at End of The Road and as a celebration of the festival’s 10th birthday, Stevens threw a party on the stage 2005 style with a joyful performance of his 10-year-old track “Come On! Feel The Illinoise!” The show was finally sealed with a thrilling, five minute long instrumental build up to close Stevens’ phenomenal gig. He then sent the audience back to their tents and camper vans feeling teary-eyed, euphoric and with a deeper understanding of life and death. 

Tune in tomorrow for the final part of our festival coverage from End of The Road!

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