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A.S. Fanning: ‘Carmelita’ Video Exclusive

A.S. Fanning: ‘Carmelita’ Video Exclusive

By: William Alexander

We’ve got A.S. Fanning in our sights and his brilliant debut single ‘Carmelita’ in our ears. Released on November 13th on Berlin’s Proper Octopus label, ‘Carmelita’ succeeds in being both honest and mysterious and is accompanied by a video that encourages you to break loose and ride out the journey that A.S. Fanning takes you on. Having already dipped his paws into the projects of Candice Gordon and Ronnie Drew, we expect great things to follow from the Berlin-based Irishman.

 

We’ve got A.S. Fanning in our sights and his brilliant debut single ‘Carmelita’ in our ears. Released on November 13th on Berlin’s Proper Octopus label, ‘Carmelita’ succeeds in being both honest and mysterious and is accompanied by a video that encourages you to break loose and ride out the journey that A.S. Fanning takes you on. Having already dipped his paws into the projects of Candice Gordon and Ronnie Drew, we expect great things to follow from the Berlin-based Irishman.

It’s safe to say that A.S. Fanning has struck a chord with us over at Disorder this week; his execution of ‘Carmelita’ is sharp, containing lyrical imagery that takes you into the deepest of all daydreams. The multi-instrumentalist songwriter previously hit the top 30 Irish charts in his time in Porn Trauma and, though they’re now disbanded, A.S. Fanning is back and by himself this time. Since he’s been up and running, and located himself in the German capital, A.S. Fanning has quickly gained interest and demand to play with the likes of Suzies Ashes, an industrial electro outfit from the same area, and The Mighty Stef, based in Dublin. It doesn’t stop there because he’s also given a helping hand in producing Candice Gordon’s debut LP and we’re excited to hear that when it eventually drops. The end of this year and the arrival of 2016 will surely see A.S. Fanning move upwards as he embarks on a string of European dates and continues to blow minds.

‘Carmelita’ opens to the sound of fresh acoustic guitar strings being thumped and fingerpicked over a sombre organ that sets the mood of the song perfectly. It really comes alive within the seventh second when A.S. Fanning’s flawless vocals enter the mix and we hear him unleash some of the most painstaking lyrics that we’ve heard in a good while. “We walked round like zombies in the burying grounds” is doubled up with a lush vocal harmony that sweetens its chilling and fuscous tone therefore making it all the more riveting and magical for the listener, notably after the line “like ghosts we don’t make a sound” which follows it moments later. You should trust us when we say his lyrics have enough heat to singe the hairs on your neck and the same goes for the video too. Crinkled light projections of urban life shine against an interior background where we see a mysterious female bop up and down in synchrony with the journey depicted behind her. It is almost as if she is performing a zombie-like stroll and if you weren’t paying attention to A.S. Fanning’s lyrics you would miss out on the connection here.

Initially the video might seem like a slightly unusual and weird choice for a song like ‘Carmelita’, and feel more suited to cater for a baggy, dream-pop anthem but you soon realise it does work and wonderfully well if we may say so. It tempts you to put everything on hold and lollygag along just like the woman that we see throughout the video. It’s not easy to pinpoint exactly what it communicates but it leaves you with a feeling: it encourages you to be upfront with your emotions and be fearless in how you take on life. Instrumentally, ‘Carmelita’ is very pleasant and comforting to listen to even though it takes you down several narrow roads that you’ve not found yourself walking down before. We’re talking about the sound of the guitar-like organ that arrives unexpectedly and then screams out in tremolo, giving the track just the crunch that it needed. It nods to moments on Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds’ The Boatman’s Call [1997] and it’s certainly a very special moment in the song, and in the video also. It’s as if it cues the female in shot dancing without a single care in the world, whilst gorgeous light shades of vermilion and blue flash on the surrounding faces. It’s hard not to find yourself mesmerised by this visual treat.

A.S. Fanning gives ‘Carmelita’ some space to breathe and cool the hell down as the track dips down in volume. The serene swirl of the organ goes hand-in-hand with the light brushing of an acoustic guitar that looks back to the opening seconds of the track. It’s a pretty sweet transition that takes an interesting turn and serves as proof that A.S. Fanning is a dynamic songwriter who clearly arranges his songs in a way that is meticulous and keeps you hooked throughout its entirety. You find so many upcoming artists nowadays attempting to fuse folk and gothic influences and to be quite honest it usually falls flat on its face; A.S. Fanning, on the other hand, sprinkles his own unique seasoning upon what he does with his music and manages to make it work. Fans of Johnny Cash and Magnetic Fields will certainly dig ‘Carmelita’ and so we implore you to take a look at the video below and keep an eye out for his London show at Sebright Arms on Thursday 17th December.

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