Disorder Magazine Logo
Meet Jerry Williams

Meet Jerry Williams

By: Danny Judge

Meet Jerry Willams, the quiet, demure girl from Portsmouth with a belter of a voice. The 19 year old singer-songwriter has only been gigging since she was 17, but is already being compared to illustrious names such as Lily Allen and Kate Nash.  Disorder have covered bands such as Enter Shikari, My Chemical Romance, and Catfish and the Bottlemen when they were small; Jerry Williams is in that sort of mega-success category. Riding off the success of her mini-tour and her latest track ‘Cold Beer’, we caught up with her to see how one of the next hottest young things is handling the sudden fame, her reading habits, and where’s she’s going next. Trust us on this one, you’ll want to know about her.

Meet Jerry Willams, the quiet, demure girl from Portsmouth with a belter of a voice. The 19 year old singer-songwriter has only been gigging since she was 17, but is already being compared to illustrious names such as Lily Allen and Kate Nash.  Disorder have covered bands such as Enter Shikari, My Chemical Romance, and Catfish and the Bottlemen when they were small; Jerry Williams is in that sort of mega-success category. Riding off the success of her mini-tour and her latest track ‘Cold Beer’, we caught up with her to see how one of the next hottest young things is handling the sudden fame, her reading habits, and where’s she’s going next. Trust us on this one, you’ll want to know about her.

 

D: So, do you only drink ‘Cold Beer’?
JW: That's such a good question, nobody's asked me that before. I do love a cold beer, but also love a Malibu and Coke as well. Everyone's gonna think I'm a proper party animal because of that song! I’ve just turned down a free drink because I'll get drunk on like one drink, and I'll probably just fall asleep. That's usually what happens.

 

D: When did you first decide to become a singer-songwriter?
JW: Uhm, well I've always grown up with music around me. My mum and dad always listened to great tracks when I was growing up, but I'm the only musical one in my family. Where iIve listened to music all my life, I just kinda decided like 'I wanna start trying this'. So I started learning classical, and I got up to grade 8 standard, but throughout that whole time I was songwriting and things like that, and it just turned out that I had a really big passion for it. I just carried on doing it, and then I played my first gig when I was 17. It just started from that.

 

D: Was there a plan for what you wanted to do before this?
J: I don't know! I loved school and I was really kind of academic. I loved Maths and English. I studied Maths at college, but didn’t know what I was going to do. My dad always told me ‘you can get into Oxford, you can get into Cambridge’, but this is more fun. I still read a lot though. It inspires songwriting, and language is so important.

 

D: Favourite author?
JW: Oh this is hard! *inaudible squeaking noise*. This is a hard question! I couldn’t say! I definitely prefer reading books that get turned into films though. Like, I read the book first and then I watch the film; I did that with a book called ‘The Lovely Bones’. The book is always better than the film though; I actually wrote a song about that called 'Books are Better'.

 

D: How has Portsmouth affected you as a singer?
JW: Well, it’s definitely inspired me. I write a lot about growing up there, y’know, my friends, school, all of that. The Portsmouth scene is really good for music as well. I hang around with lots of other artists, and everybody always supports each other. There's always something going on, with lots of little gigs everywhere, and it's definitely helped my confidence a lot to play in pubs and things. I was doing that like nearly every week or so for a while. I love it.

D: How do you feel about your current EP?
JW: I'm really proud of it, and there's been a good reception to it. People before this EP have known me as an acoustic artist in Portsmouth, because I gig a lot just me with my guitar, so when this came out everyone was like 'oh my god, this is so different!'. People have said I sound quite pop-y and stuff, but this is an EP that shows where I'm at in this time of my life. Like, it's about boys and growing up, so the next single and EP should be like a progression.

 

D: New EP? Have you got anything to release?
JW: Well, probably a couple of singles rather than EP's. I've got loads of songs in the bank already. I haven't spent a lot of time producing them up yet, but now I've got a backing band I've got a really clear vision of where I want it to go. It's just picking the right songs and producing them in the way that I want them to be. I've definitely got songs ready, it's just a matter of what songs to choose.

 

D: What are your plans for the future?
JW: There's nothing official, but I'd love to go on a tour, either by myself or with a band. Just more music videos, releases, and music production really. I'd love to start up my own home production studio, so it'd be cool to like learn and experiment.

 

D: Finally, what advice would you give to any aspiring artists out there?
JW: Just go for it. If you just write the songs that you want to write and play the songs that you want to play, then I guess you can be the artist that you want to be. Just make sure you enjoy it; you've got to expect hard days and things like that, but you've just got to focus on the future and keep aiming on the things you want. You’ll achieve it.