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Exposing grime to the rest of the world: Interview with Drime

Exposing grime to the rest of the world: Interview with Drime

By: Owen Faulkner

For many young producers looking to establish themselves within the grime scene, it can often be hard to get their foot in the door. It seems almost every twenty-something has a set of turntables and a SoundCloud account these days, making it hard to get recognised amongst this influx of would-be’s.

For many young producers looking to establish themselves within the grime scene, it can often be hard to get their foot in the door. It seems almost every twenty-something has a set of turntables and a SoundCloud account these days, making it hard to get recognised amongst this influx of would-be’s.

Catching up with south London producer and DJ Drime, this up-and-coming artist has been making big moves within the scene. From being booked to play in Switzerland to playing at WCBC Festival in the coming months, this 22-year old has a lot on his plate.

For an artist who predominantly makes grime with touches of underground dubstep, Drime is constantly looking to expand his horizons. Not only is he starting to diverge and explore new styles, he’s getting involved with artists from across the world, including an artist from Japan, where one would think grime was unheard of.

 

So Drime, could you tell us a little bit about playing abroad in Switzerland over the summer?

Yeah, sure. Basically this promoter I know, Rekah, who sorts out loads of events in Geneva booked me and another guy from Italy to play at this club called Le-Zoo.

 

That must’ve been insane! Did you enjoy it?

It was quite an experience as I’d been drinking from about 12 noon at the airport, and when I got there it was about 41 degrees. You can imagine what it was like drinking all that time – by the time it got to my set I was f@cked!

 

And you’re playing a festival in Wales soon? 

Yeah, yeah. I’m gonna be doing a grime set at WCBC festival in November. It’s a festival for charity, which is pretty cool.

 

What kind of festival is it?

It’s predominantly drum n bass and jungle focused. There’s four big stages and a variety of different tents, one of which I’ll be playing at. Some pretty big artists will be playing like General Levy and Ragga Twins.

 

Did you picture any of this when you first started DJing and producing?

No, not at all. I mean, when I first started out I had literally had no idea I’d be doing this, and wasn’t even sure if I’d want to play at a big festival or any events – I just enjoyed what I was doing. When I first start mixing, the main thing was just learning a new skill I took interest in, and having a bit of fun with it.

How did you transition from, say, a bedroom DJ into something more grounded?

I owe a lot to my time getting involved with radio. For me, it was like the dojo; radio was like the training ground, especially for MC’s and DJ’s, as you can use this time to test out tunes and see what works. You could do a funky set or a techno set, or maybe a grime set with or without MC’s. When you compare this to playing an hour set at a venue, you’re a bit restricted and have to feed a lot off the crowd. On radio, it’s literally your own radio show – you get to play what you want to play. Also if you play a weekly radio show, there’s a lot of dedication and you’re obviously gonna build up your skills. It’s been great for networking, and arranging gigs and sets in London.

 

Have you played at a lot of stations?

Initially I started out on Dubstep FM, moved onto Flex FM and I’ve played on Radar Radio too. Currently I’m on Rood FM, which I play bi-weekly on Wednesdays and Mode FM, which I play bi-weekly on Fridays. I’ve had quite a few of my tracks played on Rinse FM too. 

 

What are you working on at the moment? Got any big plans?

So yeah, I’ve been working on a tune called ‘Rambo’. It’s just been released on Architecture: Chapter 2, which is the latest EP from Classical Trax. It’s a compilation they threw together; I’m just waiting back for vocals from Jon E Clayface, Big Reky, Big John and GK for a dubplate release. I’m also working on a tune with a Japanese grime artist, Pakin.

 

Japanese grime? I think I saw Pakin on Grime Report TV. How on earth did this happen?

Yeah man, through social media. He’s already got a tune with Devilman. I think I might have heard something on Rinse FM where Elijah and Skilliam were getting involved with some Japanese artists, so I thought I’d check them out on SoundCloud and Twitter and took it from there really. You should definitely check him out!

 

It’s great how people around the world are familiarising themselves with the genre. I suppose it’s giving grime more worldwide exposure?

The genre is growing in the same way hip-hop started in the States and branched out; now it’s a worldwide genre. This exposure needs to happen in order for it to become more recognised. Same thing happened with trap music too; it’s now all over the place.

 

Do you feel you’ve come a long way since starting out?

Yes but it also feels like I haven’t achieved enough. I mean it’s weird because when you get to a certain level you realise you still have a lot to accomplish. Your goals will constantly be changing and until you reach self-actualisation you’ll never reach them. I wanna be playing with more and more different artists, I really wanna push myself. I wanna meet people with different styles of production to bring to the table and together we can make something crazy.

 

Be sure to catch Drime at the WCBC (We Can Beat Cancer) Festival in Wales between the 6th and 8th November. His new track, ‘Rambo’, along with the Architecture: Chapter 2 EP is available now on SoundCloud.

SoundCloud and IG: drimehex

Twitter: @DrimeTee

Facebook: DrimeHexagon

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