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Hot Fuzz at Graduate Fashion week 2015: Cristina Criaco

Hot Fuzz at Graduate Fashion week 2015: Cristina Criaco

By: Disorder Magazine

Cristina Criaco graduate fashion collection can only be described as authoritarian zips galore! It was the only collection at GFW that has such high use of a basic zip! It’s freaking amazing, to take something so basic and reinvent it, ingenuity at its finest. A great start to the event.

Cristina Criaco graduate fashion collection can only be described as authoritarian zips galore! It was the only collection at GFW that has such high use of a basic zip! It’s freaking amazing, to take something so basic and reinvent it, ingenuity at its finest. A great start to the event.

I spoke to the Bournemouth university graduate regarding her inspiration, where her original idea all began:

"The whole idea came about when I was making my way home from work. I saw a young kid talking to a police officer on the escalator. Everyone was looking at them, so it made me think a lot about how we define authority within a uniform. How the uniform can either make us feel safe, intimidated or scared."

It's hitting the bloody hammer on the head, the British public’s relationship with the police is wobbly at best. Even when you’ve done absolutely nothing, seeing a police officer can be alarming and unsettling. Though that is not how we are taught to feel towards authority; the perception of uniform is a pretty badass concept as every individual has their own unique relationship with the fuzz. My appreciation for the collection grows the more I find out about it.



"I ended up getting most of my inspiration from The London Riots. Investigating how the officer’s uniforms were equipped for such a crisis. This led me to research utilitarian garments throughout any work field.

The bulletproof vest gave me a lot of inspiration, which is how I ended up including pockets in most of my pieces. I was constantly thinking about a new ways of attaching a pocket, like dangling from a jumper, detachable by Velcro or overlaid onto each other. I made some of the pockets to be as big as A3 size, purely because I wanted to wear my sketchbook into uni."

London riots, bulletproof vests, police officers, I am liking this collection more and more. This history that Cristina has injected into her graduate collection makes it rich and raw. It is relevant to the youth of Britian (not just London). Now that I look at the collection again, the source of colour, the structure and tone reminds me of the current traditional uniform of the Police. However, I don’t feel that Cristina’s collection is a rejection for an authoritarian figure more like a futuristic adaptation, a friendlier and more approachable version of the uniform.

Are the fabrics the same?

"Within my collection, the fabrics I primarily used were sweatshirting, nylon, ribstop and organza. Integrating the softer fabrics with the heavier ones, overlaying the blues on the whites to create the contrast. The hi-vis tape that’s infamously depicted throughout all work-wear uniforms inspired me to create my own trimmings. Integrating polypropylene webbing with the hi-vis strips, yellow-neon tape and a black gimp braid trim. Most of the trims decorated the openings of the pockets or went as singularly on the garments to add extra impact."

There was definitely extra impact, the collection is boss! I’m intrigued to see what lies in future for Cristina Criaco.

Credits: Styling Cristina Criaco, Models Minsie Lee and Holly Holston, Photograhy Nataline Lamptey, Make up Katerina Gkinosati

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