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Alice’s Adventures Underground – Down the Rabbit Hole

Alice’s Adventures Underground – Down the Rabbit Hole

By: Kamran Tanner

This spring will be the 150th since Lewis Carroll’s novel Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland was first published. As the anniversary approaches there are a host of fixtures set to commemorate the timeless classic, few of which seem more compelling than the series of interactive experiences presented by modern theatrical troupe Les Enfants Terribles. To be performed in the atmospheric playground that is the cavernous vaults beneath Waterloo station, they are inviting visitors to step through the looking glass and into the surreal world of one of Britain’s most loved alternative realities.

This spring will be the 150th since Lewis Carroll’s novel Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland was first published. As the anniversary approaches there are a host of fixtures set to commemorate the timeless classic, few of which seem more compelling than the series of interactive experiences presented by modern theatrical troupe Les Enfants Terribles. To be performed in the atmospheric playground that is the cavernous vaults beneath Waterloo station, they are inviting visitors to step through the looking glass and into the surreal world of one of Britain’s most loved alternative realities.

Having taken the figurative tumble down the rabbit hole, participants will find their wanderlust rewarded by an immersive narrative of fantastical proportions, with the winding, heady journey that follows, personalised and fuelled by choice – ‘eat me’ and find your head bumping up against the ceiling, or ‘drink me’ and find your surroundings grow gargantuan. And as the theatrical narrative unfurls, à la pages in a book, so does the bizarre; the performers leading you on a madcap excursion to find a mislaid Alice, that promises, in Carroll-esque style, to be reminiscent of a psychedelic trip as you smoke with the Caterpillar and take tea at the behest of the Mad Hatter.

With the focus set firmly on immersion, the performances run in close and cosy groups of 52 so that each and every member of the ‘audience’ feels included and can expect to forget, if only temporarily, that above, and outside of the conjured world of dreams, a reality exists that doesn’t consist of mocking cats and sentient playing cards. 

As a particularly huge fan of Carroll’s work, and especially of his whimsical wordplay, wit and fantastically absurd approach to children’s literature, I, for one, am especially excited by the prospect.

For more information and bookings visit alice-underground.com.

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