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The Nest – A film review of David Cronenberg’s Innovative short

The Nest – A film review of David Cronenberg’s Innovative short

By: Connor McNeish

If one is unfamiliar with David Cronenberg, it may be best to be educated on the history of his work before delving into it. I watched the nine-minute short film “The Nest” with no knowledge of his history as a filmmaker.

If one is unfamiliar with David Cronenberg, it may be best to be educated on the history of his work before delving into it. I watched the nine-minute short film “The Nest” with no knowledge of his history as a filmmaker. After taking it in, I learned that Cronenberg is renowned as a mastermind of the “body-horror” genre, using his skills to create rather disturbing scenarios that revolve around horrifying things happening to the human body. Infection, disease, mutilation – he’s covered it all.

Topics such as these might repel a large majority of people, myself included. But what makes this piece stand out is the innovative way that Cronenberg approaches it. The entire nine minutes is one take of a woman sitting bare-chested in a basement, consulting a doctor about the removal of her left breast, which is filled with insects. Sound ridiculous? Well it absolutely is. Despite that ridiculous premise, it is equally just as horrifying. I finished watching the short with an extreme sense of unease, yet I can’t deny that I was curious for more. Who is this woman? What is happening to her? Why are they in a sketchy basement?

The questions that arise after the viewing of “The Nest” are more abundant than answers, and I believe that this is Cronenberg’s intention. I would say that from this short film alone, I was able to gain a glimpse into the innovative mind of Cronenberg. He pushes boundaries and explores the unknown. In today’s world of filmmaking, qualities such as these aren’t even just a positive, they are a necessity.

'The Nest' by David Cronenberg with Evelyne Brochu: